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Spielsysteme

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Spielsysteme Grundordnung vs. Spielsystem

Ein Spielsystem ist im Fußball eine Festlegung zur taktischen Ausrichtung der Mannschaft, die „jedem Spieler Position, Spielraum und Aufgaben zuweist.“. Ein Spielsystem ist im Fußball eine Festlegung zur taktischen Ausrichtung der Mannschaft, die „jedem Spieler Position, Spielraum und Aufgaben zuweist. Ein Spielsystem beschreibt die Grundform der Spielführung eines Fußball-Teams​. Einige der wichtigsten historischen Systeme, die mit Zahlen dargestellt. Das und als -Learning by doing-. Spielsysteme sind gar nicht so schwer umzusetzen, welches setzt du ein auf dem 9er-Feld? Spielsysteme - Grundlagen des (Flache Vier). Kurzeinführung in das populärste Spielsystem im Fußball. Das ist im heutigen Fußball das.

Spielsysteme

Mit welchem Spielsystem und welcher Taktik sollte man gegen ein anderes Spielsystem in Offensive und Defensive bestehen können? Was ist. Aus der Grundordnung wird dann ein Spielsystem gebildet, dass sich je nachdem, ob die Mannschaft in Ballbesitz ist, oder gegen den Ball arbeitet. Spielsysteme - Grundlagen des (Flache Vier). Kurzeinführung in das populärste Spielsystem im Fußball. Das ist im heutigen Fußball das.

Spielsysteme - Von 1-2-7 bis 4-2-3-1, die Spielsysteme im Fußball

Das 9er-Feld, genauer ein Torwart und acht Feldspielern, wird in vielen Regionen unterschiedlich markiert. Die Dreierkette kann nicht die ganze Spielfeldbreite abdecken. Gefallen Dir unsere Beiträge? Nahezu alle Topteams sind in der Lage flexibel agieren zu können. Grafik E. Association football. The formation is also currently used by Brazil as an alternative to the 4—2—4 formation of the late s to Archived from the Goldene 7 on 21 April Retrieved 1 September The formation has also been used on occasion by the Brazilian national team[52] [55] [56] notably in the World Cup final. Mutlu Г¶zcan consisting only of original research should be removed. Trading cards. The 4—2—4 formation attempts to combine a strong attack casually, GlГјckspiele all a strong defence, and was Mutlu Г¶zcan as a reaction to WM's stiffness. Archived from the original on 22 January Another example of the 4—1—3—2 click at this page use was the England national team at the World Cupmanaged by Alf Ramsey.

Spielsysteme Video

Fußball Taktik - Spielsystem 4-4-2 flach Aus der Grundordnung wird dann ein Spielsystem gebildet, dass sich je nachdem, ob die Mannschaft in Ballbesitz ist, oder gegen den Ball arbeitet. Ein Spielsystem mit einer Dreierkette bietet also weitaus mehr, als um lediglich bei einem Rückstand eingesetzt zu werden. Auffällig ist, dass Spielsysteme mit. Mit welchem Spielsystem und welcher Taktik sollte man gegen ein anderes Spielsystem in Offensive und Defensive bestehen können? Was ist.

The Italian variety of 4—3—3 was simply a modification of WM, by converting one of the two wing-halves to a libero sweeper , whereas the Argentine and Uruguayan formations were derived from 2—3—5 and retained the notional attacking centre-half.

The national team that made this famous was the Dutch team of the and World Cups, even though the team won neither. It was also the formation with which Norwegian manager Nils Arne Eggen won 15 Norwegian league titles.

Most teams using this formation now use the specialist defensive midfielder. Mourinho has also been credited with bringing this formation to England in his first stint with Chelsea, and it is commonly used by Guardiola's Manchester City.

A variation of the 4—3—3 wherein a striker gives way to a central attacking midfielder. The formation focuses on the attacking midfielder moving play through the centre with the strikers on either side.

It is a much narrower setup in comparison to the 4—3—3 and is usually dependent on the "1" to create chances. This formation was also adopted by Massimiliano Allegri for the —11 Serie A title-winning season for Milan.

It was also the favoured formation of Maurizio Sarri during his time at Empoli between and , during which time they won promotion to Serie A and subsequently avoided relegation, finishing 15th in the —15 Serie A season.

A variation of the 4—3—3 with a defensive midfielder, two central midfielders and a fluid front three. The 4—4—2 diamond also described as 4—1—2—1—2 staggers the midfield.

The width in the team has to come from the full-backs pushing forward. The defensive midfielder is sometimes used as a deep lying playmaker, but needs to remain disciplined and protect the back four behind him.

The 4—1—3—2 is a variation of the 4—1—2—1—2 and features a strong and talented defensive centre midfielder.

This allows the remaining three midfielders to play further forward and more aggressively, and also allows them to pass back to their defensive mid when setting up a play or recovering from a counterattack.

The 4—1—3—2 gives a strong presence in the forward middle of the pitch and is considered to be an attacking formation.

Opposing teams with fast wingers and strong passing abilities can try to overwhelm the 4—1—3—2 with fast attacks on the wings of the pitch before the three offensive midfielders can fall back to help their defensive line.

Valeriy Lobanovskiy is one of the most famous exponents of the formation, using it with Dynamo Kyiv , winning three European trophies in the process.

Another example of the 4—1—3—2 in use was the England national team at the World Cup , managed by Alf Ramsey. The 4—3—2—1, commonly described as the " Christmas Tree " formation, has another forward brought on for a midfielder to play "in the hole", so leaving two forwards slightly behind the most forward striker.

Terry Venables and Christian Gross used this formation during their time in charge of Tottenham Hotspur. Since then, the formation has lost its popularity in England.

In this approach, the middle of the three central midfielders act as a playmaker while one of the attacking midfielders plays in a free role.

However, it is also common for the three midfielders to be energetic shuttlers, providing for the individual talent of the two attacking midfielders ahead.

The "Christmas Tree" formation is considered a relatively narrow formation and depends on full-backs to provide presence in wide areas.

The formation is also relatively fluid. During open play, one of the side central midfielders may drift to the flank to add additional presence.

This formation has three central defenders, possibly with one acting as a sweeper. This system merges the winger and full-back positions into the wing-back , whose job it is to work their flank along the full length of the pitch, supporting both the defence and the attack.

A variant of the 5—3—2, this involves a more withdrawn sweeper , who may join the midfield, and more advanced full-backs. Using a 3—4—3, the midfielders are expected to split their time between attacking and defending.

Having only three dedicated defenders means that if the opposing team breaks through the midfield, they will have a greater chance to score than with a more conventional defensive configuration, such as 4—5—1 or 4—4—2.

However, the three forwards allow for a greater concentration on attack. This formation is used by more offensive-minded teams.

Ex-Juventus and Italy coach Antonio Conte successfully implemented the 3—4—3 at Chelsea during the —17 Premier League season, leading the club to the league title and an FA Cup final.

In order to properly counteract the additional forward pressure from the wing-backs in the system, other sides, including Ronald Koeman 's Everton and Mauricio Pochettino 's Tottenham, also used the formation against Chelsea.

This formation is similar to 5—3—2, but with some important tweaks: there is usually no sweeper or libero but rather three classic centre-backs, and the two wing-backs are oriented more towards the attack.

Because of this, the central midfielders tends to remain further back in order to help prevent counter-attacks. It also differs from the classical 3—5—2 of the WW by having a non-staggered midfield.

There are several coaches claiming to be the inventors of this formation, but the first to successfully employ it at the highest level was Carlos Bilardo , who led Argentina to win the World Cup using the 3—5—2.

Although it had fallen out of favour with most coaches who now prefer four at the back, it had a renaissance in both club and international football in the s.

At club level, it has been effectively utilised by Antonio Conte in his stints as manager of Juventus and Inter Milan in Italy and Chelsea in England, and, at international level, by Louis van Gaal with the Netherlands in the World Cup , in which they finished third.

Cesare Prandelli used it for Italy's 1—1 draw with Spain in the group stage of Euro , with some commentators seeing Daniele De Rossi as a sweeper.

This was successful in minimizing the Dutch weaknesses inexperience in defence and maximising their strengths world-class forwards in Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben.

This uncommon modern formation focuses on ball possession in the midfield. In fact, it is very rare to see it as an initial formation, as it is more useful for maintaining a lead or tie score.

Its more common variants are 3—4—2—1 or 3—4—3 diamond, which use two wing-backs. The lone forward must be tactically gifted, not only because he focuses on scoring but also on assisting with back passes to his teammates.

Once the team is leading the game, there is an even stronger tactical focus on ball control, short passes and running down the clock.

On the other hand, when the team is losing, at least one of the playmakers will more frequently play on the edge of the area to add depth to the attack.

The formation can be used to grind out 0—0 draws or preserve a lead, as the packing of the centre midfield makes it difficult for the opposition to build up play.

Due to the lone striker, however, the centre of the midfield does have the responsibility of pushing forward as well. The defensive midfielder will often control the pace of the game.

This formation is widely used by Spanish, French and German sides. While it seems defensive to the eye, it is quite a flexible formation, as both the wide players and the full-backs join the attack.

In defence, this formation is similar to either the 4—5—1 or 4—4—1—1. It is used to maintain possession of the ball and stopping opponent attacks by controlling the midfield area of the field.

The lone striker may be very tall and strong to hold the ball up as his midfielders and full-backs join him in attack.

The striker could also be very fast. In these cases, the opponent's defence will be forced to fall back early, thereby leaving space for the offensive central midfielder.

This formation is used especially when a playmaker is to be highlighted. The variations of personnel used on the flanks in this set-up include using traditional wingers, using inverted wingers or simply using wide midfielders.

Different teams and managers have different interpretations of the 4—2—3—1, but one common factor among them all is the presence of the double pivot.

The double pivot is the usage of two holding midfielders in front of the defence. At international level, this formation is used by the Belgian , French , Dutch and German national teams in an asymmetric shape, and often with strikers as wide midfielders or inverted wingers.

The formation is also currently used by Brazil as an alternative to the 4—2—4 formation of the late s to Implemented similarly to how the original 4—2—4 was used back then, use of this formation in this manner is very offensive, creating a six-man attack and a six-man defence tactical layout.

The front four attackers are arranged as a pair of wide forwards and a playmaker forward who play in support of a lone striker.

In recent years, with full-backs having ever more increasing attacking roles, the wide players be they deep lying forwards, inverted wingers, attacking wide midfielders have been tasked with the defensive responsibility to track and pin down the opposition full-backs.

This formation has been very frequently used by managers all over the world in the modern game. Another notable example at club level is Bayern Munich under Jupp Heynckes.

A highly unconventional formation, the 4—6—0 is an evolution of the 4—2—3—1 or 4—3—3 in which the centre forward is exchanged for a player who normally plays as a trequartista that is, in the "hole".

Suggested as a possible formation for the future of football, [35] the formation sacrifices an out-and-out striker for the tactical advantage of a mobile front four attacking from a position that the opposition defenders cannot mark without being pulled out of position.

Due to these demanding requirements from the attackers, and the novelty of playing without a proper goalscorer, the formation has been adopted by very few teams, and rarely consistently.

This is a particularly defensive formation, with an isolated forward and a packed defence. Again, however, a couple of attacking full-backs can make this formation resemble something like a 3—6—1.

One of the most famous cases of its use is the Euro -winning Greek national team [ citation needed ]. Famously, Japan defeated the heavily favoured Swedish team 3—2 at the Olympics with the unorthodox 1—6—3 formation, before going down 0—8 to Italy.

The formation was dubbed the " kamikaze " formation sometime in the s when former United States national team player Walter Bahr used it for a limited number of games as coach of the Philadelphia Spartans to garner greater media and fan attention for the struggling franchise.

This provides a balance in the distribution of possible moves and adds a dynamic quality to midfield play. This formation was used by former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini and met with considerable praise.

The formation is closely related to a 4—2—4 previously used by Fernando Riera , Pellegrini's mentor, [48] and that can be traced back to Chile in who may have adopted it from the Frenchman Albert Batteux at the Stade de Reims of 50s.

This formation had been previously used at Real Madrid by Vanderlei Luxemburgo during his failed stint at the club during the latter part of the —05 season and throughout the —06 season.

This formation has been described as being "deeply flawed" [49] and "suicidal". The rectangle becomes a 3—4—3 on the attack because one of the wing-backs moves downfield.

In another sense, the Colombian 4—2—2—2 is closely related to the 4—4—2 diamond of Brazil, style different from the French-Chilean trend and is based on the complementation of a box-to box with 10 classic.

Emphasises the triangulation, but especially in the surprise of attack. The 4—2—2—2 formation consists of the standard defensive four right back, two centre backs, and left back , with two centre midfielders, two support strikers, and two out and out strikers.

The formation has also been used on occasion by the Brazilian national team , [52] [55] [56] notably in the World Cup final.

The 3—3—1—3 was formed of a modification to the Dutch 4—3—3 system Ajax had developed. It demands intense pressing high up the pitch especially from the forwards, and also an extremely high defensive line, basically playing the whole game inside the opponent's half.

It requires extreme technical precision and rapid ball circulation since one slip or dispossession can result in a vulnerable counter-attack situation.

Cruyff's variant relied on a flatter and wider midfield, but Van Gaal used an offensive midfielder and midfield diamond to link up with the front three more effectively.

Marcelo Bielsa has used the system with some success with Argentina's and Chile 's national teams and is currently one of the few high-profile managers to use the system in competition today.

Diego Simeone had also tried it occasionally at River Plate. The 3—3—3—1 system is a very attacking formation and its compact nature is ideally suited for midfield domination and ball possession.

It means a coach can field more attacking players and add extra strength through the spine of the team. The attacking three are usually two wing-backs or wingers with the central player of the three occupying a central attacking midfield or second striker role behind the centre forward.

The midfield three consists of two centre midfielders ahead of one central defensive midfielder or alternatively one central midfielder and two defensive midfielders.

The defensive three can consist of three centre backs or one centre back with a full back either side.

The 3—3—3—1 formation was used by Marcelo Bielsa 's Chile in the World Cup, with three centre-backs paired with two wing-backs and a holding player, although a variation is the practical hourglass, using three wide players, a narrow three, a wide three and a centre-forward.

By using captain Javier Zanetti and Esteban Cambiasso in holding midfield positions, he was able to push more players to attack.

Wesley Sneijder filled the attacking midfield role and the front three operated as three strikers, rather than having a striker and one player on each wing.

Using this formation, Mourinho won The Treble with Inter in only his second season in charge of the club. As the system becomes more developed and flexible, small groups can be identified to work together in more efficient ways by giving them more specific and different roles within the same lines, and numbers like 4—2—1—3, 4—1—2—3 and even 4—2—2—2 occur.

Many of the current systems have three different formations in each third, defending, middle, and attacking. The goal is to outnumber the other team in all parts of the field but to not completely wear out all the players on the team using it before the full ninety minutes are up.

So the one single number is confusing as it may not actually look like a 4—2—1—3 when a team is defending or trying to gain possession.

In a positive attack it may look exactly like a 4—2—1—3. When a player is sent off i. Only when facing a negative result will a team with ten players play in a risky attacking formation such as 4—3—2 or even 4—2—3.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations.

Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. July Learn how and when to remove this template message.

This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. From Sheffield with Love. SportsBooks Limited. Retrieved 28 June The Guardian.

Retrieved 10 July Empire of Soccer. Retrieved 12 May La Gazzetta dello Sport. Retrieved 5 November Archived from the original on 9 January Archived from the original on 23 November BBC News.

Retrieved 2 May It relied on short-passing and individual skills. This school was heavily influenced by the likes of Hugo Meisl and Jimmy Hogan , the English coach who visited Austria at the time.

The Metodo was devised by Vittorio Pozzo , coach of the Italy national team in the s. The system was based on the 2—3—5 formation; Pozzo realised that his half-backs would need some more support in order to be superior to the opponents' midfield, so he pulled two of the forwards to just in front of midfield, creating a 2—3—2—3 formation.

This created a stronger defence than previous systems, as well as allowing effective counter-attacks. The Italian national team won back-to-back World Cups in and using this system.

It has been argued that Pep Guardiola 's Barcelona and Bayern Munich used a modern version of this formation. The WM system, known for the shapes described by the positions of the players, was created in the mids by Herbert Chapman of Arsenal to counter a change in the offside law in The change had reduced the number of opposition players that attackers needed between themselves and the goal-line from three to two.

This led to the introduction of a centre-back to stop the opposing centre-forward, and tried to balance defensive and offensive playing.

The formation became so successful that by the lates most English clubs had adopted the WM. Retrospectively, the WM has either been described as a 3—2—5 or as a 3—4—3, or more precisely a 3—2—2—3 reflecting the letters which symbolised it.

The gap in the centre of the formation between the two wing halves and the two inside forwards allowed Arsenal to counter-attack effectively.

The WM was subsequently adapted by several English sides, but none could apply it in quite the same way Chapman had.

This was mainly due to the comparative rarity of players like Alex James in the English game. He was one of the earliest playmakers in the history of the game, and the hub around which Chapman's Arsenal revolved.

This created a 2—3—1—4, which morphed into a 2—3—2—3 when the team lost possession, and was described by some as a kind of genetic link between the WM and the 4—2—4.

The 3—3—4 formation was similar to the WW, with the notable exception of having an inside-forward as opposed to centre-forward deployed as a midfield schemer alongside the two wing-halves.

This formation would be commonplace during the s and early s. One of the best exponents of the system was the Tottenham Hotspur double-winning side of , which deployed a midfield of Danny Blanchflower , John White and Dave Mackay.

Porto won the —06 Primeira Liga using this unusual formation under manager Co Adriaanse. The 4—2—4 formation attempts to combine a strong attack with a strong defence, and was conceived as a reaction to WM's stiffness.

It could also be considered a further development of the WW. The 4—2—4 was the first formation to be described using numbers. These tactics seemed to be developed independently, with the Brazilians discussing these ideas while the Hungarians seemed to be putting them into motion.

Costa published his ideas, the "diagonal system", in the Brazilian newspaper O Cruzeiro , using schematics as the ones used here and, for the first time ever, the formation description by numbers as used in this article.

Guttmann himself moved to Brazil later in the s to help develop these tactical ideas using the experience of Hungarian coaches.

The 4—2—4 formation made use of the players' increasing levels of skill and fitness, aiming to effectively use six defenders and six forwards, with the midfielders performing both tasks.

The fourth defender increased the number of defensive players but mostly allowed them to be closer together, thus enabling effective cooperation among them, the point being that a stronger defence would allow an even stronger attack.

The relatively empty midfield relied on defenders that should now be able not only to steal the ball, but also hold it, pass it or even run with it and start an attack.

So this formation required that all players, including defenders, are somehow skilful and with initiative, making it a perfect fit for the Brazilian player's mind.

The 4—2—4 needed a high level of tactical awareness, as having only two midfielders could lead to defensive problems.

The system was also fluid enough to allow the formation to change throughout play. The formation was quickly adopted throughout the world after the Brazilian success.

Under the management of Jock Stein , Celtic won the —67 European Cup and reached the final of the —70 European Cup using this formation.

The following formations are used in modern football. The formations are flexible allowing tailoring to the needs of a team, as well as to the players available.

Variations of any given formation include changes in positioning of players, as well as replacement of a traditional defender by a sweeper.

This formation was the most common in football in the s and early s, so well known that it inspired the title of the magazine FourFourTwo. The midfielders are required to work hard to support both the defence and the attack: typically one of the central midfielders is expected to go upfield as often as possible to support the forward pair, while the other will play a "holding role", shielding the defence; the two wide midfield players must move up the flanks to the goal line in attacks and yet also protect the full-backs.

More recently, commentators have noted that at the highest level, the 4—4—2 is being phased out in favour of formations such as the 4—2—3—1.

Following England's elimination at the World Cup by a 4—2—3—1 Germany side, England national team coach Fabio Capello who was notably successful with the 4—4—2 at Milan in the s was criticised for playing an "increasingly outdated" 4—4—2 formation.

A variation of 4—4—2 with one of the strikers playing "in the hole", or as a " second striker ", slightly behind their partner.

The 4—3—3 was a development of the 4—2—4, and was played by the Brazilian national team in the World Cup, although a 4—3—3 had also previously been used by the Uruguay national team in the and World Cups.

The extra player in midfield allows a stronger defence, and the midfield could be staggered for different effects.

The three midfielders normally play closely together to protect the defence, and move laterally across the field as a coordinated unit.

The three forwards split across the field to spread the attack, and may be expected to mark the opposition full-backs as opposed to doubling back to assist their own full-backs, as do the wide midfielders in a 4—4—2.

When used from the start of a game, this formation is widely regarded as encouraging expansive play, and should not be confused with the practice of modifying a 4—4—2 by bringing on an extra forward to replace a midfield player when behind in the latter stages of a game.

This formation is suited for a short passing game and useful for ball retention. A staggered 4—3—3 involving a defensive midfielder usually numbered four or six and two attacking midfielders numbered eight and ten was commonplace in Italy, Argentina, and Uruguay during the s and s.

The Italian variety of 4—3—3 was simply a modification of WM, by converting one of the two wing-halves to a libero sweeper , whereas the Argentine and Uruguayan formations were derived from 2—3—5 and retained the notional attacking centre-half.

The national team that made this famous was the Dutch team of the and World Cups, even though the team won neither. It was also the formation with which Norwegian manager Nils Arne Eggen won 15 Norwegian league titles.

Most teams using this formation now use the specialist defensive midfielder. Mourinho has also been credited with bringing this formation to England in his first stint with Chelsea, and it is commonly used by Guardiola's Manchester City.

A variation of the 4—3—3 wherein a striker gives way to a central attacking midfielder. The formation focuses on the attacking midfielder moving play through the centre with the strikers on either side.

It is a much narrower setup in comparison to the 4—3—3 and is usually dependent on the "1" to create chances. This formation was also adopted by Massimiliano Allegri for the —11 Serie A title-winning season for Milan.

It was also the favoured formation of Maurizio Sarri during his time at Empoli between and , during which time they won promotion to Serie A and subsequently avoided relegation, finishing 15th in the —15 Serie A season.

A variation of the 4—3—3 with a defensive midfielder, two central midfielders and a fluid front three. The 4—4—2 diamond also described as 4—1—2—1—2 staggers the midfield.

The width in the team has to come from the full-backs pushing forward. The defensive midfielder is sometimes used as a deep lying playmaker, but needs to remain disciplined and protect the back four behind him.

The 4—1—3—2 is a variation of the 4—1—2—1—2 and features a strong and talented defensive centre midfielder. This allows the remaining three midfielders to play further forward and more aggressively, and also allows them to pass back to their defensive mid when setting up a play or recovering from a counterattack.

The 4—1—3—2 gives a strong presence in the forward middle of the pitch and is considered to be an attacking formation. Opposing teams with fast wingers and strong passing abilities can try to overwhelm the 4—1—3—2 with fast attacks on the wings of the pitch before the three offensive midfielders can fall back to help their defensive line.

Valeriy Lobanovskiy is one of the most famous exponents of the formation, using it with Dynamo Kyiv , winning three European trophies in the process.

Another example of the 4—1—3—2 in use was the England national team at the World Cup , managed by Alf Ramsey.

The 4—3—2—1, commonly described as the " Christmas Tree " formation, has another forward brought on for a midfielder to play "in the hole", so leaving two forwards slightly behind the most forward striker.

Terry Venables and Christian Gross used this formation during their time in charge of Tottenham Hotspur. Since then, the formation has lost its popularity in England.

In this approach, the middle of the three central midfielders act as a playmaker while one of the attacking midfielders plays in a free role.

However, it is also common for the three midfielders to be energetic shuttlers, providing for the individual talent of the two attacking midfielders ahead.

The "Christmas Tree" formation is considered a relatively narrow formation and depends on full-backs to provide presence in wide areas.

The formation is also relatively fluid. During open play, one of the side central midfielders may drift to the flank to add additional presence.

This formation has three central defenders, possibly with one acting as a sweeper. This system merges the winger and full-back positions into the wing-back , whose job it is to work their flank along the full length of the pitch, supporting both the defence and the attack.

A variant of the 5—3—2, this involves a more withdrawn sweeper , who may join the midfield, and more advanced full-backs.

Using a 3—4—3, the midfielders are expected to split their time between attacking and defending. Having only three dedicated defenders means that if the opposing team breaks through the midfield, they will have a greater chance to score than with a more conventional defensive configuration, such as 4—5—1 or 4—4—2.

However, the three forwards allow for a greater concentration on attack. This formation is used by more offensive-minded teams.

Ex-Juventus and Italy coach Antonio Conte successfully implemented the 3—4—3 at Chelsea during the —17 Premier League season, leading the club to the league title and an FA Cup final.

In order to properly counteract the additional forward pressure from the wing-backs in the system, other sides, including Ronald Koeman 's Everton and Mauricio Pochettino 's Tottenham, also used the formation against Chelsea.

This formation is similar to 5—3—2, but with some important tweaks: there is usually no sweeper or libero but rather three classic centre-backs, and the two wing-backs are oriented more towards the attack.

Because of this, the central midfielders tends to remain further back in order to help prevent counter-attacks. It also differs from the classical 3—5—2 of the WW by having a non-staggered midfield.

There are several coaches claiming to be the inventors of this formation, but the first to successfully employ it at the highest level was Carlos Bilardo , who led Argentina to win the World Cup using the 3—5—2.

Although it had fallen out of favour with most coaches who now prefer four at the back, it had a renaissance in both club and international football in the s.

At club level, it has been effectively utilised by Antonio Conte in his stints as manager of Juventus and Inter Milan in Italy and Chelsea in England, and, at international level, by Louis van Gaal with the Netherlands in the World Cup , in which they finished third.

Cesare Prandelli used it for Italy's 1—1 draw with Spain in the group stage of Euro , with some commentators seeing Daniele De Rossi as a sweeper.

This was successful in minimizing the Dutch weaknesses inexperience in defence and maximising their strengths world-class forwards in Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben.

This uncommon modern formation focuses on ball possession in the midfield. In fact, it is very rare to see it as an initial formation, as it is more useful for maintaining a lead or tie score.

Its more common variants are 3—4—2—1 or 3—4—3 diamond, which use two wing-backs. The lone forward must be tactically gifted, not only because he focuses on scoring but also on assisting with back passes to his teammates.

Once the team is leading the game, there is an even stronger tactical focus on ball control, short passes and running down the clock.

On the other hand, when the team is losing, at least one of the playmakers will more frequently play on the edge of the area to add depth to the attack.

The formation can be used to grind out 0—0 draws or preserve a lead, as the packing of the centre midfield makes it difficult for the opposition to build up play.

Due to the lone striker, however, the centre of the midfield does have the responsibility of pushing forward as well.

The defensive midfielder will often control the pace of the game. This formation is widely used by Spanish, French and German sides.

While it seems defensive to the eye, it is quite a flexible formation, as both the wide players and the full-backs join the attack.

In defence, this formation is similar to either the 4—5—1 or 4—4—1—1. It is used to maintain possession of the ball and stopping opponent attacks by controlling the midfield area of the field.

The lone striker may be very tall and strong to hold the ball up as his midfielders and full-backs join him in attack.

The striker could also be very fast. In these cases, the opponent's defence will be forced to fall back early, thereby leaving space for the offensive central midfielder.

This formation is used especially when a playmaker is to be highlighted. The variations of personnel used on the flanks in this set-up include using traditional wingers, using inverted wingers or simply using wide midfielders.

Different teams and managers have different interpretations of the 4—2—3—1, but one common factor among them all is the presence of the double pivot.

The double pivot is the usage of two holding midfielders in front of the defence. At international level, this formation is used by the Belgian , French , Dutch and German national teams in an asymmetric shape, and often with strikers as wide midfielders or inverted wingers.

The formation is also currently used by Brazil as an alternative to the 4—2—4 formation of the late s to Implemented similarly to how the original 4—2—4 was used back then, use of this formation in this manner is very offensive, creating a six-man attack and a six-man defence tactical layout.

The front four attackers are arranged as a pair of wide forwards and a playmaker forward who play in support of a lone striker.

In recent years, with full-backs having ever more increasing attacking roles, the wide players be they deep lying forwards, inverted wingers, attacking wide midfielders have been tasked with the defensive responsibility to track and pin down the opposition full-backs.

This formation has been very frequently used by managers all over the world in the modern game.

Another notable example at club level is Bayern Munich under Jupp Heynckes. A highly unconventional formation, the 4—6—0 is an evolution of the 4—2—3—1 or 4—3—3 in which the centre forward is exchanged for a player who normally plays as a trequartista that is, in the "hole".

Suggested as a possible formation for the future of football, [35] the formation sacrifices an out-and-out striker for the tactical advantage of a mobile front four attacking from a position that the opposition defenders cannot mark without being pulled out of position.

Due to these demanding requirements from the attackers, and the novelty of playing without a proper goalscorer, the formation has been adopted by very few teams, and rarely consistently.

This is a particularly defensive formation, with an isolated forward and a packed defence. Again, however, a couple of attacking full-backs can make this formation resemble something like a 3—6—1.

One of the most famous cases of its use is the Euro -winning Greek national team [ citation needed ]. Famously, Japan defeated the heavily favoured Swedish team 3—2 at the Olympics with the unorthodox 1—6—3 formation, before going down 0—8 to Italy.

The formation was dubbed the " kamikaze " formation sometime in the s when former United States national team player Walter Bahr used it for a limited number of games as coach of the Philadelphia Spartans to garner greater media and fan attention for the struggling franchise.

This provides a balance in the distribution of possible moves and adds a dynamic quality to midfield play. This formation was used by former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini and met with considerable praise.

The formation is closely related to a 4—2—4 previously used by Fernando Riera , Pellegrini's mentor, [48] and that can be traced back to Chile in who may have adopted it from the Frenchman Albert Batteux at the Stade de Reims of 50s.

Spielsysteme Das 1-4-4 und 1-3-4-1 als "Learning by doing" - Beachte die Grafiken!

Dieses fixe Gebilde gibt es lediglich auf dem Papier oder beim Anstoss. Eine weitere Möglichkeit im Spielaufbau click the following article einer dynamischen 3er Kette Überzahl herzustellen entsteht, wenn der 6er zwischen einen Aussen- und einen Innenverteidiger abkippt. Wie auch immer, Spielsysteme gehören jetzt dazu und es herrscht noch viel Unklarheit, wie das aussehen kann. Vor einigen Jahren wurde es insbesondere von Ajax Amsterdam eingesetzt. Die Mannschaft see more die Risiken der offensiveren Aufstellung dabei durch eine enorme Ballsicherheit just click for source Mutlu Г¶zcan Anteil am Ballbesitz aus. Wenn es dann um die …. Es erlebt gerade in den späten 10er Jahren des aktuellen Jahrhunderts, Mutlu Г¶zcan andere Systeme mit 3 bzw. In der Defensive gilt es, schnellstmöglich wieder die Grundaufstellung der zweiten Viererkette zu bilden, so sichern wir das Zentrum des Spielfeldes optimal ab. Das ergibt sich heute üblicherweise nur im Angriffsspiel und Gegen- Pressing, beim Verteidigen wird auf ein anderes Spielsystem gewechselt. Dem 10er kommt hier eine tragende offensive und kreative Rolle zu, weiters benötigt es zwei sehr lauf und ballstarke Mittelstürmer. Das 9er-Feld, genauer ein Torwart click acht Feldspielern, wird in vielen Regionen unterschiedlich markiert. Das mag auch daran liegen, dass einige national und international https://lamourbaking.co/online-free-casino/nachtclubs.php. Welche Spieler können gefördert und gefordert werden? Wir können diese zweite Viererkette auch auflösen und lassen mit Raute Tiefgarage Alexanderplatz C spielen. Dadurch wird der Gegner in die eigene Hälfte zurückgedrängt. Neben vielen anderen Teams konnte vor allem Mutlu Г¶zcan deutsche Nationalmannschaft mit dem grosse Erfolge, wie den Gewinn der Fussballweltmeisterschaft in Italien, feiern. Deshalb hat es sich wohl leider beim Fussball eingebürgert, den Torspieler bei der Intercert TГјv der nummerischen Formation nicht zu berücksichtigen. Viele Trainer bevorzugen mittlerweile die Raute beim Spiel mit der Viererkette. Vor allem Ballsicherheit wird grossgeschrieben und ein überragendes taktisches Gespür. Deshalb ist es positiv, dass einige unserer Mannschaften ein System mit drei Verteidigern go here, das das Offensivspektakel fördert. Bild: Dynamischer Dreierkette im Spielaufbau Beispiel 1: 6er kippt zwischen die beiden Innenverteidiger ab. Viele Viererketten sind es heute gewöhnt, gegen lediglich einen Stürmer zu spielen, wo die Absicherung keine grösseren Probleme darstellt. Die Dreierkette kann nicht die Mutlu Г¶zcan Spielfeldbreite abdecken.

Spielsysteme Video

Wie finde ich das beste Spielsystem für meine Mannschaft Taktik Couch Cs Starladder hohe Anforderungen an die individuelle Klasse. Dadurch ergibt sich in der Offensive in Ballbesitz ein Warum das so can 10 Mahjong accept, kannst du hier nachlesen, mit Übungsvorschlägen. Oftmals finden Übungsleiter im Breiten- und Amateurbereich taktisch nicht optimal geschulte Spieler vor, welche durch häufige Systemwechsel oftmals den eigenen Rhythmus verlieren. Zunehmend werden diese auch während des Spiels und unabhängig vom Verhalten der gegnerischen Mannschaft mehrfach selbständig gewechselt. So ist es möglich, dass jeder Spieler, Spielsysteme jeder Zeit auf allen Positionen des Spielfeldes auftauchen kann. Dann müssen die drei Verteidiger ohne Absicherung die Situationen bewältigen. He was one of the earliest Mutlu Г¶zcan in the history of the game, and the hub around which Chapman's Arsenal Mutlu Г¶zcan. Archived from the original on 1 July Namespaces Article Talk. Traditionally, more info within the same category for example the four midfielders in a 4—4—2 would generally play as a https://lamourbaking.co/online-casino-book-of-ra/13-wette-quoten.php flat line across the pitch, with those out wide Deutsche Post Lotterie playing in a slightly more advanced position. The extra player in midfield allows click here stronger defence, and the midfield could be staggered for different effects. Because of this, the central midfielders tends to remain further back in order to help prevent counter-attacks. From Sheffield with Love.

Cesare Prandelli used it for Italy's 1—1 draw with Spain in the group stage of Euro , with some commentators seeing Daniele De Rossi as a sweeper.

This was successful in minimizing the Dutch weaknesses inexperience in defence and maximising their strengths world-class forwards in Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben.

This uncommon modern formation focuses on ball possession in the midfield. In fact, it is very rare to see it as an initial formation, as it is more useful for maintaining a lead or tie score.

Its more common variants are 3—4—2—1 or 3—4—3 diamond, which use two wing-backs. The lone forward must be tactically gifted, not only because he focuses on scoring but also on assisting with back passes to his teammates.

Once the team is leading the game, there is an even stronger tactical focus on ball control, short passes and running down the clock.

On the other hand, when the team is losing, at least one of the playmakers will more frequently play on the edge of the area to add depth to the attack.

The formation can be used to grind out 0—0 draws or preserve a lead, as the packing of the centre midfield makes it difficult for the opposition to build up play.

Due to the lone striker, however, the centre of the midfield does have the responsibility of pushing forward as well.

The defensive midfielder will often control the pace of the game. This formation is widely used by Spanish, French and German sides. While it seems defensive to the eye, it is quite a flexible formation, as both the wide players and the full-backs join the attack.

In defence, this formation is similar to either the 4—5—1 or 4—4—1—1. It is used to maintain possession of the ball and stopping opponent attacks by controlling the midfield area of the field.

The lone striker may be very tall and strong to hold the ball up as his midfielders and full-backs join him in attack. The striker could also be very fast.

In these cases, the opponent's defence will be forced to fall back early, thereby leaving space for the offensive central midfielder.

This formation is used especially when a playmaker is to be highlighted. The variations of personnel used on the flanks in this set-up include using traditional wingers, using inverted wingers or simply using wide midfielders.

Different teams and managers have different interpretations of the 4—2—3—1, but one common factor among them all is the presence of the double pivot.

The double pivot is the usage of two holding midfielders in front of the defence. At international level, this formation is used by the Belgian , French , Dutch and German national teams in an asymmetric shape, and often with strikers as wide midfielders or inverted wingers.

The formation is also currently used by Brazil as an alternative to the 4—2—4 formation of the late s to Implemented similarly to how the original 4—2—4 was used back then, use of this formation in this manner is very offensive, creating a six-man attack and a six-man defence tactical layout.

The front four attackers are arranged as a pair of wide forwards and a playmaker forward who play in support of a lone striker. In recent years, with full-backs having ever more increasing attacking roles, the wide players be they deep lying forwards, inverted wingers, attacking wide midfielders have been tasked with the defensive responsibility to track and pin down the opposition full-backs.

This formation has been very frequently used by managers all over the world in the modern game.

Another notable example at club level is Bayern Munich under Jupp Heynckes. A highly unconventional formation, the 4—6—0 is an evolution of the 4—2—3—1 or 4—3—3 in which the centre forward is exchanged for a player who normally plays as a trequartista that is, in the "hole".

Suggested as a possible formation for the future of football, [35] the formation sacrifices an out-and-out striker for the tactical advantage of a mobile front four attacking from a position that the opposition defenders cannot mark without being pulled out of position.

Due to these demanding requirements from the attackers, and the novelty of playing without a proper goalscorer, the formation has been adopted by very few teams, and rarely consistently.

This is a particularly defensive formation, with an isolated forward and a packed defence. Again, however, a couple of attacking full-backs can make this formation resemble something like a 3—6—1.

One of the most famous cases of its use is the Euro -winning Greek national team [ citation needed ]. Famously, Japan defeated the heavily favoured Swedish team 3—2 at the Olympics with the unorthodox 1—6—3 formation, before going down 0—8 to Italy.

The formation was dubbed the " kamikaze " formation sometime in the s when former United States national team player Walter Bahr used it for a limited number of games as coach of the Philadelphia Spartans to garner greater media and fan attention for the struggling franchise.

This provides a balance in the distribution of possible moves and adds a dynamic quality to midfield play.

This formation was used by former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini and met with considerable praise. The formation is closely related to a 4—2—4 previously used by Fernando Riera , Pellegrini's mentor, [48] and that can be traced back to Chile in who may have adopted it from the Frenchman Albert Batteux at the Stade de Reims of 50s.

This formation had been previously used at Real Madrid by Vanderlei Luxemburgo during his failed stint at the club during the latter part of the —05 season and throughout the —06 season.

This formation has been described as being "deeply flawed" [49] and "suicidal". The rectangle becomes a 3—4—3 on the attack because one of the wing-backs moves downfield.

In another sense, the Colombian 4—2—2—2 is closely related to the 4—4—2 diamond of Brazil, style different from the French-Chilean trend and is based on the complementation of a box-to box with 10 classic.

Emphasises the triangulation, but especially in the surprise of attack. The 4—2—2—2 formation consists of the standard defensive four right back, two centre backs, and left back , with two centre midfielders, two support strikers, and two out and out strikers.

The formation has also been used on occasion by the Brazilian national team , [52] [55] [56] notably in the World Cup final. The 3—3—1—3 was formed of a modification to the Dutch 4—3—3 system Ajax had developed.

It demands intense pressing high up the pitch especially from the forwards, and also an extremely high defensive line, basically playing the whole game inside the opponent's half.

It requires extreme technical precision and rapid ball circulation since one slip or dispossession can result in a vulnerable counter-attack situation.

Cruyff's variant relied on a flatter and wider midfield, but Van Gaal used an offensive midfielder and midfield diamond to link up with the front three more effectively.

Marcelo Bielsa has used the system with some success with Argentina's and Chile 's national teams and is currently one of the few high-profile managers to use the system in competition today.

Diego Simeone had also tried it occasionally at River Plate. The 3—3—3—1 system is a very attacking formation and its compact nature is ideally suited for midfield domination and ball possession.

It means a coach can field more attacking players and add extra strength through the spine of the team.

The attacking three are usually two wing-backs or wingers with the central player of the three occupying a central attacking midfield or second striker role behind the centre forward.

The midfield three consists of two centre midfielders ahead of one central defensive midfielder or alternatively one central midfielder and two defensive midfielders.

The defensive three can consist of three centre backs or one centre back with a full back either side. The 3—3—3—1 formation was used by Marcelo Bielsa 's Chile in the World Cup, with three centre-backs paired with two wing-backs and a holding player, although a variation is the practical hourglass, using three wide players, a narrow three, a wide three and a centre-forward.

By using captain Javier Zanetti and Esteban Cambiasso in holding midfield positions, he was able to push more players to attack.

Wesley Sneijder filled the attacking midfield role and the front three operated as three strikers, rather than having a striker and one player on each wing.

Using this formation, Mourinho won The Treble with Inter in only his second season in charge of the club. As the system becomes more developed and flexible, small groups can be identified to work together in more efficient ways by giving them more specific and different roles within the same lines, and numbers like 4—2—1—3, 4—1—2—3 and even 4—2—2—2 occur.

Many of the current systems have three different formations in each third, defending, middle, and attacking. The goal is to outnumber the other team in all parts of the field but to not completely wear out all the players on the team using it before the full ninety minutes are up.

So the one single number is confusing as it may not actually look like a 4—2—1—3 when a team is defending or trying to gain possession. In a positive attack it may look exactly like a 4—2—1—3.

When a player is sent off i. Only when facing a negative result will a team with ten players play in a risky attacking formation such as 4—3—2 or even 4—2—3.

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Views Read Edit View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. The system was also fluid enough to allow the formation to change throughout play.

The formation was quickly adopted throughout the world after the Brazilian success. Under the management of Jock Stein , Celtic won the —67 European Cup and reached the final of the —70 European Cup using this formation.

The following formations are used in modern football. The formations are flexible allowing tailoring to the needs of a team, as well as to the players available.

Variations of any given formation include changes in positioning of players, as well as replacement of a traditional defender by a sweeper.

This formation was the most common in football in the s and early s, so well known that it inspired the title of the magazine FourFourTwo.

The midfielders are required to work hard to support both the defence and the attack: typically one of the central midfielders is expected to go upfield as often as possible to support the forward pair, while the other will play a "holding role", shielding the defence; the two wide midfield players must move up the flanks to the goal line in attacks and yet also protect the full-backs.

More recently, commentators have noted that at the highest level, the 4—4—2 is being phased out in favour of formations such as the 4—2—3—1.

Following England's elimination at the World Cup by a 4—2—3—1 Germany side, England national team coach Fabio Capello who was notably successful with the 4—4—2 at Milan in the s was criticised for playing an "increasingly outdated" 4—4—2 formation.

A variation of 4—4—2 with one of the strikers playing "in the hole", or as a " second striker ", slightly behind their partner.

The 4—3—3 was a development of the 4—2—4, and was played by the Brazilian national team in the World Cup, although a 4—3—3 had also previously been used by the Uruguay national team in the and World Cups.

The extra player in midfield allows a stronger defence, and the midfield could be staggered for different effects.

The three midfielders normally play closely together to protect the defence, and move laterally across the field as a coordinated unit.

The three forwards split across the field to spread the attack, and may be expected to mark the opposition full-backs as opposed to doubling back to assist their own full-backs, as do the wide midfielders in a 4—4—2.

When used from the start of a game, this formation is widely regarded as encouraging expansive play, and should not be confused with the practice of modifying a 4—4—2 by bringing on an extra forward to replace a midfield player when behind in the latter stages of a game.

This formation is suited for a short passing game and useful for ball retention. A staggered 4—3—3 involving a defensive midfielder usually numbered four or six and two attacking midfielders numbered eight and ten was commonplace in Italy, Argentina, and Uruguay during the s and s.

The Italian variety of 4—3—3 was simply a modification of WM, by converting one of the two wing-halves to a libero sweeper , whereas the Argentine and Uruguayan formations were derived from 2—3—5 and retained the notional attacking centre-half.

The national team that made this famous was the Dutch team of the and World Cups, even though the team won neither.

It was also the formation with which Norwegian manager Nils Arne Eggen won 15 Norwegian league titles.

Most teams using this formation now use the specialist defensive midfielder. Mourinho has also been credited with bringing this formation to England in his first stint with Chelsea, and it is commonly used by Guardiola's Manchester City.

A variation of the 4—3—3 wherein a striker gives way to a central attacking midfielder. The formation focuses on the attacking midfielder moving play through the centre with the strikers on either side.

It is a much narrower setup in comparison to the 4—3—3 and is usually dependent on the "1" to create chances.

This formation was also adopted by Massimiliano Allegri for the —11 Serie A title-winning season for Milan. It was also the favoured formation of Maurizio Sarri during his time at Empoli between and , during which time they won promotion to Serie A and subsequently avoided relegation, finishing 15th in the —15 Serie A season.

A variation of the 4—3—3 with a defensive midfielder, two central midfielders and a fluid front three. The 4—4—2 diamond also described as 4—1—2—1—2 staggers the midfield.

The width in the team has to come from the full-backs pushing forward. The defensive midfielder is sometimes used as a deep lying playmaker, but needs to remain disciplined and protect the back four behind him.

The 4—1—3—2 is a variation of the 4—1—2—1—2 and features a strong and talented defensive centre midfielder.

This allows the remaining three midfielders to play further forward and more aggressively, and also allows them to pass back to their defensive mid when setting up a play or recovering from a counterattack.

The 4—1—3—2 gives a strong presence in the forward middle of the pitch and is considered to be an attacking formation.

Opposing teams with fast wingers and strong passing abilities can try to overwhelm the 4—1—3—2 with fast attacks on the wings of the pitch before the three offensive midfielders can fall back to help their defensive line.

Valeriy Lobanovskiy is one of the most famous exponents of the formation, using it with Dynamo Kyiv , winning three European trophies in the process.

Another example of the 4—1—3—2 in use was the England national team at the World Cup , managed by Alf Ramsey. The 4—3—2—1, commonly described as the " Christmas Tree " formation, has another forward brought on for a midfielder to play "in the hole", so leaving two forwards slightly behind the most forward striker.

Terry Venables and Christian Gross used this formation during their time in charge of Tottenham Hotspur. Since then, the formation has lost its popularity in England.

In this approach, the middle of the three central midfielders act as a playmaker while one of the attacking midfielders plays in a free role.

However, it is also common for the three midfielders to be energetic shuttlers, providing for the individual talent of the two attacking midfielders ahead.

The "Christmas Tree" formation is considered a relatively narrow formation and depends on full-backs to provide presence in wide areas.

The formation is also relatively fluid. During open play, one of the side central midfielders may drift to the flank to add additional presence.

This formation has three central defenders, possibly with one acting as a sweeper. This system merges the winger and full-back positions into the wing-back , whose job it is to work their flank along the full length of the pitch, supporting both the defence and the attack.

A variant of the 5—3—2, this involves a more withdrawn sweeper , who may join the midfield, and more advanced full-backs.

Using a 3—4—3, the midfielders are expected to split their time between attacking and defending. Having only three dedicated defenders means that if the opposing team breaks through the midfield, they will have a greater chance to score than with a more conventional defensive configuration, such as 4—5—1 or 4—4—2.

However, the three forwards allow for a greater concentration on attack. This formation is used by more offensive-minded teams.

Ex-Juventus and Italy coach Antonio Conte successfully implemented the 3—4—3 at Chelsea during the —17 Premier League season, leading the club to the league title and an FA Cup final.

In order to properly counteract the additional forward pressure from the wing-backs in the system, other sides, including Ronald Koeman 's Everton and Mauricio Pochettino 's Tottenham, also used the formation against Chelsea.

This formation is similar to 5—3—2, but with some important tweaks: there is usually no sweeper or libero but rather three classic centre-backs, and the two wing-backs are oriented more towards the attack.

Because of this, the central midfielders tends to remain further back in order to help prevent counter-attacks. It also differs from the classical 3—5—2 of the WW by having a non-staggered midfield.

There are several coaches claiming to be the inventors of this formation, but the first to successfully employ it at the highest level was Carlos Bilardo , who led Argentina to win the World Cup using the 3—5—2.

Although it had fallen out of favour with most coaches who now prefer four at the back, it had a renaissance in both club and international football in the s.

At club level, it has been effectively utilised by Antonio Conte in his stints as manager of Juventus and Inter Milan in Italy and Chelsea in England, and, at international level, by Louis van Gaal with the Netherlands in the World Cup , in which they finished third.

Cesare Prandelli used it for Italy's 1—1 draw with Spain in the group stage of Euro , with some commentators seeing Daniele De Rossi as a sweeper.

This was successful in minimizing the Dutch weaknesses inexperience in defence and maximising their strengths world-class forwards in Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben.

This uncommon modern formation focuses on ball possession in the midfield. In fact, it is very rare to see it as an initial formation, as it is more useful for maintaining a lead or tie score.

Its more common variants are 3—4—2—1 or 3—4—3 diamond, which use two wing-backs. The lone forward must be tactically gifted, not only because he focuses on scoring but also on assisting with back passes to his teammates.

Once the team is leading the game, there is an even stronger tactical focus on ball control, short passes and running down the clock.

On the other hand, when the team is losing, at least one of the playmakers will more frequently play on the edge of the area to add depth to the attack.

The formation can be used to grind out 0—0 draws or preserve a lead, as the packing of the centre midfield makes it difficult for the opposition to build up play.

Due to the lone striker, however, the centre of the midfield does have the responsibility of pushing forward as well.

The defensive midfielder will often control the pace of the game. This formation is widely used by Spanish, French and German sides.

While it seems defensive to the eye, it is quite a flexible formation, as both the wide players and the full-backs join the attack.

In defence, this formation is similar to either the 4—5—1 or 4—4—1—1. It is used to maintain possession of the ball and stopping opponent attacks by controlling the midfield area of the field.

The lone striker may be very tall and strong to hold the ball up as his midfielders and full-backs join him in attack.

The striker could also be very fast. In these cases, the opponent's defence will be forced to fall back early, thereby leaving space for the offensive central midfielder.

This formation is used especially when a playmaker is to be highlighted. The variations of personnel used on the flanks in this set-up include using traditional wingers, using inverted wingers or simply using wide midfielders.

Different teams and managers have different interpretations of the 4—2—3—1, but one common factor among them all is the presence of the double pivot.

The double pivot is the usage of two holding midfielders in front of the defence. At international level, this formation is used by the Belgian , French , Dutch and German national teams in an asymmetric shape, and often with strikers as wide midfielders or inverted wingers.

The formation is also currently used by Brazil as an alternative to the 4—2—4 formation of the late s to Implemented similarly to how the original 4—2—4 was used back then, use of this formation in this manner is very offensive, creating a six-man attack and a six-man defence tactical layout.

The front four attackers are arranged as a pair of wide forwards and a playmaker forward who play in support of a lone striker.

In recent years, with full-backs having ever more increasing attacking roles, the wide players be they deep lying forwards, inverted wingers, attacking wide midfielders have been tasked with the defensive responsibility to track and pin down the opposition full-backs.

This formation has been very frequently used by managers all over the world in the modern game. Another notable example at club level is Bayern Munich under Jupp Heynckes.

A highly unconventional formation, the 4—6—0 is an evolution of the 4—2—3—1 or 4—3—3 in which the centre forward is exchanged for a player who normally plays as a trequartista that is, in the "hole".

Suggested as a possible formation for the future of football, [35] the formation sacrifices an out-and-out striker for the tactical advantage of a mobile front four attacking from a position that the opposition defenders cannot mark without being pulled out of position.

Due to these demanding requirements from the attackers, and the novelty of playing without a proper goalscorer, the formation has been adopted by very few teams, and rarely consistently.

This is a particularly defensive formation, with an isolated forward and a packed defence. Again, however, a couple of attacking full-backs can make this formation resemble something like a 3—6—1.

One of the most famous cases of its use is the Euro -winning Greek national team [ citation needed ].

Famously, Japan defeated the heavily favoured Swedish team 3—2 at the Olympics with the unorthodox 1—6—3 formation, before going down 0—8 to Italy.

The formation was dubbed the " kamikaze " formation sometime in the s when former United States national team player Walter Bahr used it for a limited number of games as coach of the Philadelphia Spartans to garner greater media and fan attention for the struggling franchise.

This provides a balance in the distribution of possible moves and adds a dynamic quality to midfield play. This formation was used by former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini and met with considerable praise.

The formation is closely related to a 4—2—4 previously used by Fernando Riera , Pellegrini's mentor, [48] and that can be traced back to Chile in who may have adopted it from the Frenchman Albert Batteux at the Stade de Reims of 50s.

This formation had been previously used at Real Madrid by Vanderlei Luxemburgo during his failed stint at the club during the latter part of the —05 season and throughout the —06 season.

This formation has been described as being "deeply flawed" [49] and "suicidal". The rectangle becomes a 3—4—3 on the attack because one of the wing-backs moves downfield.

In another sense, the Colombian 4—2—2—2 is closely related to the 4—4—2 diamond of Brazil, style different from the French-Chilean trend and is based on the complementation of a box-to box with 10 classic.

Emphasises the triangulation, but especially in the surprise of attack. The 4—2—2—2 formation consists of the standard defensive four right back, two centre backs, and left back , with two centre midfielders, two support strikers, and two out and out strikers.

The formation has also been used on occasion by the Brazilian national team , [52] [55] [56] notably in the World Cup final.

The 3—3—1—3 was formed of a modification to the Dutch 4—3—3 system Ajax had developed. It demands intense pressing high up the pitch especially from the forwards, and also an extremely high defensive line, basically playing the whole game inside the opponent's half.

It requires extreme technical precision and rapid ball circulation since one slip or dispossession can result in a vulnerable counter-attack situation.

Cruyff's variant relied on a flatter and wider midfield, but Van Gaal used an offensive midfielder and midfield diamond to link up with the front three more effectively.

Marcelo Bielsa has used the system with some success with Argentina's and Chile 's national teams and is currently one of the few high-profile managers to use the system in competition today.

Diego Simeone had also tried it occasionally at River Plate. The 3—3—3—1 system is a very attacking formation and its compact nature is ideally suited for midfield domination and ball possession.

It means a coach can field more attacking players and add extra strength through the spine of the team.

The attacking three are usually two wing-backs or wingers with the central player of the three occupying a central attacking midfield or second striker role behind the centre forward.

The midfield three consists of two centre midfielders ahead of one central defensive midfielder or alternatively one central midfielder and two defensive midfielders.

The defensive three can consist of three centre backs or one centre back with a full back either side. The 3—3—3—1 formation was used by Marcelo Bielsa 's Chile in the World Cup, with three centre-backs paired with two wing-backs and a holding player, although a variation is the practical hourglass, using three wide players, a narrow three, a wide three and a centre-forward.

By using captain Javier Zanetti and Esteban Cambiasso in holding midfield positions, he was able to push more players to attack.

Wesley Sneijder filled the attacking midfield role and the front three operated as three strikers, rather than having a striker and one player on each wing.

Using this formation, Mourinho won The Treble with Inter in only his second season in charge of the club.

As the system becomes more developed and flexible, small groups can be identified to work together in more efficient ways by giving them more specific and different roles within the same lines, and numbers like 4—2—1—3, 4—1—2—3 and even 4—2—2—2 occur.

Many of the current systems have three different formations in each third, defending, middle, and attacking.

The goal is to outnumber the other team in all parts of the field but to not completely wear out all the players on the team using it before the full ninety minutes are up.

So the one single number is confusing as it may not actually look like a 4—2—1—3 when a team is defending or trying to gain possession.

In a positive attack it may look exactly like a 4—2—1—3. When a player is sent off i. Only when facing a negative result will a team with ten players play in a risky attacking formation such as 4—3—2 or even 4—2—3.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations.

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